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WHAT'S ON  ->  WATERFORD WRITERS WEEKEND -> BOOKS, BEARDS AND BEGRUDGERY

"Books, Beards & Begrudgery" 

Shaun Bythell Interviewed By Bob Johnson.

 

Event:

Books Beards and Begrudgery

Date :

Sunday 28th  October.

Time:

12:00pm

Venue:

The  Parlour Vintage Tea Room.

Admission:

FREE EVENT

 

Shaun Bythell owns Scotland’s largest second-hand bookshop and has turned his pithy observations on customers into the bestselling Diary Of A Bookseller.

In conversation with fellow bookshop owner Bob Johnson of The Gutter Bookshop.

Bob Johnstown.

Bob Johnston is the owner of The Gutter Bookshop in Dublin’s Temple Bar and Dalkey. He was awarded ‘Independent Bookshop of the Year UK and Ireland’ in 2017 and ‘Irish Bookseller of the Year’ in 2016. He’s been working as a bookseller across independent and chain bookshops for the past 29 years, and when he’s not selling books he’s either reading them or talking about them.

 


The Gutter Bookshop Limited.

Cow's Lane, Temple Bar,

Dublin,

Ireland,

D08 DK27.

Tel. +353 1 6799206

20 Railway Road, Dalkey,

Co Dublin,

Ireland,

A96 VW52.

Tel. +353 1 2859633

 
"We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars"
- Oscar Wilde.

 

WINNER Independent Bookshop of the Year UK & Ireland 2017
WINNER Irish Bookseller of the Year 2016
SHORTLISTED Irish Times Best Shops 2016

Shaun Bythell.

'Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Wigtown - Scotland's largest second-hand bookshop. It contains 100,000 books, spread over a mile of shelving, with twisting corridors and roaring fires, and all set in a beautiful, rural town by the edge of the sea. A book-lover's paradise? Well, almost ...


In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff, who include the ski-suit-wearing, bin-foraging Nicky. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books (both lost classics and new discoveries), introduces us to the thrill of the unexpected find, and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye'.