WHEN ALL IS RUIN ONCE AGAIN

WHAT'S ON  -> IAF -> WHEN ALL IS...

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A FILM BY - KEITH WALSH

Venue:

Garter Lane Theatre

Date:

Thursday, 22nd October

Time:

6:30pm

Admission:

€10.00

Booking through:

www.garterlane.ie
or call 051-855038

A rural community commit their lives to memory as a new motorway ploughs onwards through their landscape, a glaring symbol of our modern age. What will remain when nature inevitably subsumes it all?

Keith Walsh was born in Waterford in the south east of Ireland. His first exposure to cameras was at 13 when he began filming with his older brother. He studied Film and Television in Galway City and began working professionally while in college.

Over the past 25 years he has worked specifically in non – fiction – directing, shooting and editing his own work with long time collaborator Jill Beardsworth. Their work has screened at over 50 festivals worldwide and picked up several awards, most recently best cinematography for When All is Ruin Once Again at the Galway Film Fleadh.

Come join us at this special screening and meet the director, creator and Waterfordian that is Keith Walsh, talking about the work and journey of making When All is Ruined Once Again.

 

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DIRECTOR'S NOTES:

The genesis for this film was hearing the news that a new stretch of motorway was to by-pass the rural community I live in, heralding the dawn of a new era; a faster more modern, more efficient super highway. The impending change was palpable; in the pubs, hurling clubs, at the fire-sides and in the community halls everyone was talking about the ‘road’ and whose land it was going to pass through, whether it was going to avoid the fairy forts and whitethorn trees, badger sets and gas pipe lines.

My instinct was to begin documenting the people who lived in this area and my feeling was in some way to preserve their memory before they were shoved out of view and forgotten by the advent of the motorway. Memory, legacy, our connection to the land and the purpose of our presence here on the earth began to fill my mind as I filmed. These concerns deepened by the birth of my 2 children and the death of my father-in-law and I felt like broadening the scope of the film by exploring the notion of life, death, heaven and hell.

When I moved closer to Gort during the making of the film, W. B Yeats a frequent ‘local’ in the south Galway region started to occupy my thoughts. Yeats believed that history was a pattern of eras that were born, matured and finally died, like humans. The current era, or gyre as he called them, that we live in, known as the Anthropocene is one defined by human’s impact on the natural world. The motorway seemed like a symbol of this era; a superb shrine to the gospel of progress and our unending quest to tame nature.

Eight days after the motorway opened in November 2010 Ireland lost lost its sovereignty to the IMF/ EU bailout throwing the country into a deep recession and an exodus of people from the area ensued. The road stopped, progress stopped… until it started again. In September 2017 the motorway went on a further 50 kms. The film’s action takes place during these recession years and is bookended by the openings of two stretches of motorway.

Onwards ever onwards.

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